Ruth Ley: Linking host genotype to microbiome variation in twins

Website: http://www.leylab.com


Barbara Treutlein: Reconstructing human organogenesis using single-cell transcriptomics

Short Bio: Barbara Treutlein studied chemistry at the Universities of Tübingen and Mainz and at UC Berkeley in 2001-2007. From 2007-2012, she performed her doctoral research in single-molecule biophysics with Jens Michaelis at LMU Munich, followed by a Postdoc in the field of single-cell genomics with Stephen Quake at Stanford University from 2012-2014. Since 2015, she is a Max Planck Research group leader at the MPI-EVA in Leipzig and the MPI-CBG in Dresden. In 2016, Barbara Treutlein was appointed as a tenure-track assistant professor at TU Munich.

Website: http://www.treutleinlab.org/


Birte Höcker: Design of protein folds and functions

Short Bio: Höcker studied biology at Göttingen and biochemistry at Köln university. She joined the Duke University Medical Center in Durham, NC, as a post-doctoral fellow in 2003 and became a Group Leader at the MPI for Developmental Biology Tübingen in 2006. In 2015 she was awarded an ERC consolidator grant and the Otto-Meyerhof award. Since 2016 she is Professor of Biochemistry at University Bayreuth.

Website: http://www.proteindesign.uni-bayreuth.de/


Richard Neher: Virus evolution and the predictability of next year’s flu

Short Bio: Neher studied physics at the universities of Göttingen and Munich. In 2007, he joined the Kavli Institute for Theoretical Physics at the University of California, Santa Barbara as a post-doctoral fellow and became an independent Max Planck Research Group Leader in Tübingen in 2010. He joined the faculty of the University of Basel in 2017. He was awarded an European Research Council starting grant (2010), the ARCHES prize (2012), and OpenSciencePrize (2017).

Website: http://neherlab.org


Mihai Pop: Challenges and opportunities in computational microbiome-ology

Short Bio: Dr. Pop is a professor in the Department of Computer Science and the Center for Bioinformatics and Computational Biology at the University of Maryland, College Park (UMCP) and currently serves as the Interim Director of the Institute for Advanced Computer Studies. His lab has developed a number of widely used open-source software tools, such as the assembly suite AMOS, the NGS aligner Bowtie, and the metagenomic assembly package MetAMOS. He also co-led the data analysis working group for the Human Microbiome Project and led the sub-group responsible for the assembly of the data generated in this project. Dr. Pop’s current research interests include metagenomic assembly and analysis algorithms, software testing in bioinformatics, and dynamic models of microbial communities. He is also actively involved in teaching at the undergraduate and graduate levels and is strongly interested in the development of educational resources for introductory computer science and bioinformatics.

Website: http://www.cbcb.umd.edu/~mpop/